Saxon Palace restoration is last stage of rebuilding Warsaw after WWII: official

"This is the last stage of the reconstruction of Warsaw after the hecatomb of World War II, and at the same time a symbol of our steadfastness and a message for future generations," Piotr Gliński, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Culture, National Heritage and Sports, said in an interview with the "Do Rzeczy" weekly, commenting on the reconstruction of Saxon Palace .

When asked why the idea of ​​restoring the palace is so important, Mr Gliński stated that it is a matter of "Polish identity, our common memory, our cultural and historical heritage."

"This is the last stage in the reconstruction of Warsaw after the hecatomb of World War II, and at the same time a symbol of our steadfastness and a message for future generations," the deputy Prime Minister noted.

Piotr Gliński pointed out that there are plans to rebuild the Saxon Palace together with the Brühl Palace and three corner tenement houses on the side of Królewska Street in Warsaw. He stated that these three buildings constitute one coherent architectural and urban project, amassing a total of approximately 75,000 square metres between them.

The Minister announced that the architectural aspect of the building would probably refer to the interwar period. "There are still some discussions taking place about what will be inside the building," he added.

The Palace, erected as a result of the expansion of the 17th-century palace of Jan Andrzej Morsztyn (a leading poet of the Polish Baroque), was rebuilt many times in the following centuries. During the Second Polish Republic, it was the seat of the General Staff of the Polish Army.

After the destruction of the Saxon Palace by the Germans at the end of December 1944, the only trace of it remained a fragment of the three central arcades with the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier - a symbolic grave commemorating the nameless soldiers who died in the defense of Poland and the celebration site of the most important national holidays.

The reconstruction of the Saxon Palace was part of the commemoration of the hundredth anniversary of Poland regaining independence, celebrated in 2018.

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